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Nice guy.  Have some blogs.  Do baseball research.

Thursday, July 26, 2012

Ichiro Suzuki: is he the most overrated player this millennium?

Ichiro Suzuki received 48% of the fan vote responding to the question of the game yesterday: which of four players recently acquired by contenders would have the greatest impact.  Hanley Ramirez was second with 38%.

As a Yankee fan I'm embarrassed.  Ichiro?  The Yankees don't even need Ichiro.  I don't know why they acquired him.  His numbers are way down in 2012: .262 BA, .290 OBP and OPS+ 83.  His career OPS+ is only 113.  2011 .272 BA, .310 OBP.  That sucks.

It's batting average (BA), the venerable baseball stat that won't die.  Ichiro has .322 career BA with a modest .366 OBP, which is really low considering his BA.  Plus, Ichiro led the American conference two of his first four seasons: .350 and .372.  Also, .351 and .352 in later seasons.  People are still really impressed with BA.

But the guy does not walk and does not hit home runs.  He gets on base.

On Base Percentage career: Ichiro is tied at number 366 with two Jasons: Kendall and Thompson.  Derek Jeter, another get on base guy, is number 158.

Yankee fans, wake the heck up!

Sunday, July 22, 2012

35 home runs with last name of a President.

216 batters have hit at least 35 home runs in a season.  Six of them had the last name of a President.

Click link to see the details.


Query1
FirstOfFirstOfnameFirst FirstOfFirstOfnameLast
Joe Carter
Reggie Jackson
Davey Johnson
Howard Johnson
Hack Wilson
Preston Wilson


20 game winners with last name of a President.

Since 1903 397 pitchers have won at least 20 games in a season.  Sixteen of them had the last name of a President.  Click link to see the details.

qry20WinPitchersSince1903Presidents
First Last
Babe Adams
Guy Bush
Joe Bush
Russ Ford
Whitey Ford
Mudcat Grant
Danny Jackson
Larry Jackson
Randy Johnson
Walter Johnson
Ian Kennedy
Vern Kennedy
Billy Pierce
Dummy Taylor
Jack Taylor
Earl Wilson

Friday, July 20, 2012

A-Rod: where's the love? Part 2.

Tuesday, May 1, 2012 A-Rod: where's the love?

Rodriguez is number 14 on the list for Runs scored.  Scoring another 50 runs will move  Rodriguez past Craig Biggio, Mel Ott, Tris Speaker and Lou Gehrig into tenth place.

So by the end of the 2012 season Alex Rodriguez should be #4 in home runs, #6 in RBI and #10 in Runs.

Derek Jeter's claim to offensive fame is that he gets on base, runs the bases well and scores.  Jeter is #17 in Runs (1,785) 53 behind Rodriguez and unlikely to ever catch him, especially considering that Jeter is 13 months older than Rodriguez:
Jeter born: June 26, 1974
Rodriguez born: July 27, 1975
______________________________________

During last night's Yankee 4-3 loss in Oakland Derek Jeter scored a run, which tied him with Eddie Collins at #16 with 1,821 runs scored.  The Yankee Entertainment Sports (YES) network put a list of players on the screen to show where Jeter was on the all time list but did not show all players ahead of Jeter.  Below Jeter YES highlighted the leader: Rickey Henderson at 2,295.  Above Collins and Jeter the partial list showed:
14. Craig Biggio 1,844
15. Frank Robinson 1,829

Had YES shown just two more players viewers would have seen this:
12. Alex Rodriguez 1,874
13. Mel Ott 1,859

Why not show Jeter's Yankee teammate Alex Rodriguez?  Was this done intentionally or was it simply a case of stupidity?  Did someone think it would diminish Jeter to show him moving up the list but still behind his much better teammate?  Or did the person simply not know?  Even the announcers for the game, Ken Singleton and David Cone did not mention Rodriguez.

The Yankees and YES and all broadcasters should always show a complete list even if it means scanning up and down.  The list should include some additional context such as plate appearances, at bats, years played, Hall of Fame, years played.

For all the fuss about Reggie Jackson criticizing Alex Rodriguez recently the Yankees themselves continue to demean the extraordinary accomplishments of Alex Rodriguez.

See Thursday, June 9, 2011 Derek Jeter v. Álex Rodríguez
OK, it's pretty obvious that Álex Rodríguez is a much better player than Derek Jeter.

Monday, July 16, 2012

Pitchers get visits from coaches. Why not batters ... and fielders?

It's absurd that baseball allows coaches to stand on the field full time at first and third base.  And that it permits visits to the pitchers.  Two visits per pitcher.  So why not allow visits to the batters?  And the fielders?  And base runners?

Make it even more of a farce.

Thursday, July 12, 2012

What sucks the life out of games? Dead time between pitches.

The last four games that the Yankees played before the all star break were in Boston: Friday night, Saturday afternoon, Saturday night, Sunday night.  Here are times to complete those nine inning games and the TV broadcaster.

3:59 Yanks won 10-8 local TV
3:07 Yanks won 6-1 local TV
3:36 Red Sox won 9-5 Fox (Red Sox did not bat in ninth)
4:02 Yanks won 7-3 ESPN

TV broadcaster does not seem to be the only culprit in making these games LONG, boring and unwatchable.  I fired up the DVR for at least the final excruciating innings of each game so that I could fast forward between each pitch because each batter steps out of the box between each pitch to wander aimlessly for no apparent reason other than his batting coach has no better instruction.  And, of course, the pitching coach had given comparable instruction to his wards.

As mentioned here previously game seven of the 1960 World Series took 2:36.  Final score: 10-9 Pirates over the Yankees.  More runs were scored in that game than in any of the four in Boston.  OK, the Pirates still had three outs to go so the game could have taken longer but it still would have been much shorter than the recent mess in Boston.  

Most people blame the commercials and pitching changes for the games being so long.  That 1960 WS game had a comparable number of pitching changes.  Pitchers should be changed on the fly: no mound visit, no warm-ups.  That would speed things up.  Commercials are not going away.

But what really sucks the life out of Major Baseball League (MBL) games is the dead time between each of the 300 pitches.  MBL money grubbers are not even making money during those pointless delays, unless MBL wants to keep its captive audience at the park longer to entice fans to buy more over priced stuff.

Meanwhile, at home, viewers like me are increasingly turning off and/or doing other stuff and not paying attention to the game.  MBL is in trouble that will cause it to crash by the year 2020 when MBL will predictably do too little, too late.

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

youtube: Where is the outrage?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u7tK2mQIkxE

This is an experiment.  I used free Google Hangouts On Air to record and broadcast this live just a few minutes ago.  The recording is available on youtube at the link above.  Obviously, no one was likely to have realized that there was a live event in time to join this public hangout but in the future I might schedule an event and make that known here at my written blog.

Google Hangouts On Air permits up to nine others to join simultaneously.  As moderator I can drop someone who is disruptive and even ban that person from future participation.

This could be a better more dynamic medium than the blogtalkradio thing I did for a while:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/radicalbaseball/2010/11/04/various-new-topics

Let's see how it goes.

Monday, July 9, 2012

Red Sox fans, why mock Derek Jeter?

During last night's Yankee game in Fenway Park Boston Yankee captain and icon Derek Jeter dropped a routine pop fly for an error and an unearned run.  Red Sox fans cheered.  That was not unexpected but what was surprising was that the cheering persisted and clearly turned into mocking Jeter.

I am a Yankee fan but I realize that the baseball deification of Derek Jeter is premature, unwarranted and overdone.  Still, the guy plays hard and almost always says the right thing, no matter how boring.  See:

Thursday, September 16, 2010 Derek Jeter behaved badly and should apologize.

So why mock Jeter?  Was it Boston's parochialism that led it to abuse its greatest athlete, Bill Russell of the Celtics?  Was it the insulation of having more black people on the two baseball teams combined than in the Fenway stands?

I've seen his before.  In 1978 Boston fans mocked Yankee pitcher Catfish Hunter when the Red Sox drove the clearly ailing Hunter from the mound.  What satisfaction did they derive?  Catfish, who stoically took the abuse, was another noble warrior who never offended them except that he played for the Yankees.  Jeter does not merely play for the Yankees.  Derek Jeter is a Yankee.  Always was.  Always will be.

New York's not perfect.  To quote myself:

I never met a Met fan who knew what he was talking about ... or a Boston fan of any sport.

Wednesday, July 4, 2012

Nasty Factor

mlb.com

I was glancing at the pitch by pitch for a game today and saw NF (Nasty Factor) in addition to a description (fastball, slider, etc.) and miles per hour (mph).  I can't find the balloon definition but it seemed interesting.

For the few minutes I followed the game this way it helped me see what the previous batter had done, which I missed because I was so bored I was doing other stuff, like watching the 1972 movie 1776.  Hey, I'm a real American.

radicalbaseball.blogspot.com

Tuesday, July 3, 2012

Can one player lead both conferences in one season?


The Major Baseball League (MBL) has pretty easy standards for qualifying for leading in an average category.

For batters: 502 plate appearances (PA), even for batting average (BA), which does not use PA as its denominator.  Go figure.

For pitchers: 162 innings.

Jimmy Rollins set the record for PA in 2007: 778.  Only 28 times have batters had at least 750 PA.

For a batter to qualify for BA leadership in each conference in the same season the batter would need at least 502 PA times 2: 1,004.  That's very unlikely.

However, it is possible for a pitcher to qualify.  Many pitchers in modern times have had 162*2 = 324 innings in a season.  Since WWII (for the twitter intelligentsia, that's World War II (2): "since" would be after 1945) it's been done 27 times.  For instance, Sandy Koufax had 335 innings pitched (IP) in 1965 and 323 in 1966, just one short.


Rk Player IP Year Age Tm Lg G GS CG SHO GF W L W-L% SV H R ER BB SO ERA ERA+ HR BF HBP
1 Wilbur Wood 376.2 1972 30 CHW AL 49 49 20 8 0 24 17 .585 0 325 119 105 74 193 2.51 126 28 1490 7
2 Mickey Lolich 376.0 1971 30 DET AL 45 45 29 4 0 25 14 .641 0 336 133 122 92 308 2.92 124 36 1538 7
3 Bob Feller 371.1 1946 27 CLE AL 48 42 36 10 5 26 15 .634 4 277 101 90 153 348 2.18 151 11 1512 3
4 Wilbur Wood 359.1 1973 31 CHW AL 49 48 21 4 1 24 20 .545 0 381 166 138 91 199 3.46 116 25 1531 7
5 Robin Roberts 346.2 1953 26 PHI NL 44 41 33 5 2 23 16 .590 2 324 119 106 61 198 2.75 153 30 1412 2
6 Steve Carlton 346.1 1972 27 PHI NL 41 41 30 8 0 27 10 .730 0 257 84 76 87 310 1.97 182 17 1351 1
7 Gaylord Perry 344.0 1973 34 CLE AL 41 41 29 7 0 19 19 .500 0 315 143 129 115 238 3.38 117 34 1410 5
8 Gaylord Perry 342.2 1972 33 CLE AL 41 40 29 5 1 24 16 .600 1 253 79 73 82 234 1.92 168 17 1345 12
9 Phil Niekro 342.0 1979 40 ATL NL 44 44 23 1 0 21 20 .512 0 311 160 129 113 208 3.39 119 41 1436 11
10 Robin Roberts 336.2 1954 27 PHI NL 45 38 29 4 6 23 15 .605 4 289 116 111 56 185 2.97 136 35 1331 5
11 Denny McLain 336.0 1968 24 DET AL 41 41 28 6 0 31 6 .838 0 241 86 73 63 280 1.96 154 31 1288 6
12 Sandy Koufax 335.2 1965 29 LAD NL 43 41 27 8 2 26 8 .765 2 216 90 76 71 382 2.04 160 26 1297 5
13 Phil Niekro 334.1 1978 39 ATL NL 44 42 22 4 1 19 18 .514 1 295 129 107 102 248 2.88 142 16 1389 13
14 Wilbur Wood 334.0 1971 29 CHW AL 44 42 22 7 2 22 13 .629 1 272 95 71 62 210 1.91 189 21 1316 7
15 Nolan Ryan 332.2 1974 27 CAL AL 42 41 26 3 1 22 16 .579 0 221 127 107 202 367 2.89 118 18 1392 9
16 Phil Niekro 330.1 1977 38 ATL NL 44 43 20 2 1 16 20 .444 0 315 166 148 164 262 4.03 111 26 1428 8
17 Robin Roberts 330.0 1952 25 PHI NL 39 37 30 3 2 28 7 .800 2 292 104 95 45 148 2.59 141 22 1310 5
18 Gaylord Perry 328.2 1970 31 SFG NL 41 41 23 5 0 23 13 .639 0 292 138 117 84 214 3.20 125 27 1336 8
19 Fergie Jenkins 328.1 1974 31 TEX AL 41 41 29 6 0 25 12 .676 0 286 117 103 45 225 2.82 126 27 1305 8
20 Catfish Hunter 328.0 1975 29 NYY AL 39 39 30 7 0 23 14 .622 0 248 107 94 83 177 2.58 144 25 1294 5
21 Mickey Lolich 327.1 1972 31 DET AL 41 41 23 4 0 22 14 .611 0 282 100 91 74 250 2.50 127 29 1321 11
22 Nolan Ryan 326.0 1973 26 CAL AL 41 39 26 4 2 21 16 .568 1 238 113 104 162 383 2.87 123 18 1355 7
23 Juan Marichal 325.2 1968 30 SFG NL 38 38 30 5 0 26 9 .743 0 295 106 88 46 218 2.43 123 21 1307 6
24 Gaylord Perry 325.1 1969 30 SFG NL 40 39 26 3 1 19 14 .576 0 290 115 90 91 233 2.49 142 23 1345 11
25 Bert Blyleven 325.0 1973 22 MIN AL 40 40 25 9 0 20 17 .541 0 296 109 91 67 258 2.52 156 16 1321 9
Rk Player IP Year Age Tm Lg G GS CG SHO GF W L W-L% SV H R ER BB SO ERA ERA+ HR BF HBP
26 Fergie Jenkins 325.0 1971 28 CHC NL 39 39 30 3 0 24 13 .649 0 304 114 100 37 263 2.77 141 29 1299 5
27 Denny McLain 325.0 1969 25 DET AL 42 41 23 9 0 24 9 .727 0 288 105 101 67 181 2.80 134 25 1304 4
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 7/3/2012.