Friday, June 23, 2017

Titleist baseballs for exceptional exit velocity and 1,000 foot Home Runs.

Aaron Judge has hit the longest Home Run so far in 2017: 495 feet.

Mickey Mantle's longest homer: Yankee Stadium, May 22, 1963 off Bill Fischer. Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Mickey Mantle hit a walk off game winning homer off Bill Fischer leading off the bottom of the eleventh inning...

"Mantle Aims at Right-Field Sky" by John Drebinger, The New York Times, May 26, 1963


"Mantle just missed by a matter of about six feet ... Just six feet higher and he would have made it.

It was the second time he had driven a ball against that facade under the roof. The first was on May 30, 1956, off Pedro Ramos, then with the Senators."
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How far might it have gone had it not hit the top of the Stadium facade

http://www.hittrackeronline.com/historic.php?id=1963_3

Hit Tracker estimates the true distance of the Mantle "facade" homer at 504 feet
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The maximum distance a batted baseball can travel on a fly is about 500 feet. Mantle's 1953 565 foot homer in Washington has been debunked for decades. Five hundred feet is the max. Until now.

Baseball commissioner Rob Manfred, the A-Rod Slayer, got his promotion to succeed Allan Huber "Bud" Selig because of his persecution of Alex Rodriguez for performance enhancing drugs (PED) even though Rodriguez never failed a drug test. What better cover for changing the physics of baseball than to have Manfred do it?

Baseballs are juiced. Wednesday, June 14, 2017

I've been suggesting to friends this season that too many batters are hitting too many homers too far...

My informal common sense conclusion has been that the balls are juiced...


Baseball is experiencing a home run spike because the balls are juiced
By Craig Calcaterra June 14, 2017, 1:34 PM EDT

on pace to shatter the all-time single season home run record in 2017 by over 300 homers...


an obvious explanation is a juiced ball...

Micheal Lichtman ...

... it seems pretty clear based on this article that the ball was changed, it was changed intentionally and that those changes are the primary reason we are seeing a record number of homers.

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The Juiced Ball Is Back
New testing suggests the baseball is at least partially responsible for MLB’s huge homer spike
by Ben Lindbergh, Staff Writer, The Ringer June 14, 2017

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Manfred is too inept to deal with the pace of play disaster that's devolving baseball into an historic relic, so he has the Major Baseball League using performance enhancing baseballs.

Enter Titleist.

Unfortunately none of the recent studies looked for dimples on the baseballs. You know, those smooth spherical indentations on golf balls that help them go long distances.

http://www.titleist.com/golf-balls/velocity

The Titleist Velocity golf ball delivers fast initial ball speed on all full swing shots for explosive distance ...

Dimple design
The spherically-tiled 328 tetrahedral dimple design provides a soaring flight to maximize carry distance for Velocity.

Core
The size of the LSX core is bigger for more ball speed contributing longer distance on all shots.

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Those are tetrahedral dimples, not some ordinary kind.

The tough part is sneaking in the changes gradually so that fans won't notice until one day: pow - 1,000 foot Home Runs.

Then once people are hooked, selling merchandise:


Thursday, June 22, 2017

Rogers Hornsby as manager removed pitchers from the dugout. Sounds good.

OK, not the entire time he was managing but eventually Rogers Hornsby would stay in the dugout and remove his pitcher from there. Now some of the time Hornsby was a player-manager and since he was usually playing second base in those years, his presence on the mound was natural. His most famous pitching change was in game seven of the 1926 World Series at Yankee Stadium.

http://sabr.org/bioproj/person/b5854fe4

Game Seven turned into a classic. The Cardinals led 3-2 in the bottom of the seventh, but after the Yankees loaded the bases with two outs, Hornsby signaled for Alexander to come in from the bullpen. No one knows for certain what kind of shape Alex was in, but he told Hornsby he felt fine when he reached the mound.53 He took only three warm-up pitches before facing Tony Lazzeri, who hit a long foul on a 1-and-2 pitch that was almost a grand slam. But Lazzeri then struck out to end the threat.
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Thirty-nine year old Pete Alexander (Grover Cleveland Alexander) had pitched a complete game victory (104 pitches) the day before. Alexander finished game seven with Hornsby recording the final putout, tagging Babe Ruth trying to steal second base.

Hornsby last played in the majors in 1937.

While managing the St. Louis Browns for their first 52 games in 1952:

http://sabr.org/bioproj/person/b5854fe4

The acerbic Hornsby had general contempt for pitchers and continued his long-standing practice of making pitching changes from the dugout.104

104. According to one story, Hornsby didn’t go to the mound to change pitchers because once when he did, the pitcher talked Hornsby into letting him stay in the game, swearing that he could get the next batter out. About the time Hornsby returned to the dugout, that batter hit a home run. From then on, he didn’t want to risk being talked out of removing a pitcher. Guinn, 52.
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Baseball has devolved to where the manager signals for the relief pitcher on his way to the mound. Now you know why. There's nothing to discuss and the pitcher simply leaves.

I can remember when the pitcher would wait for his relief to arrive and hand the ball to the new pitcher. Now the manager takes the ball and controls all.

Only people in uniform may go onto the field during a game. Prohibit non players from wearing the team uniform, so that manager and coaches are prevented from going out there and causing needless delay. Change pitchers from the dugout, like Rogers Hornsby.

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

How tall was Bill Dickey? How reliable are player heights?

Bill Dickey, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, Tony Lazzeri:


Cliff Blau sent a link to the facebook page of Fritz Peterson, which contained the photo above. The photo was probably taken in either 1936 or 1937 when all four Yankee Hall of Fame players were teammates.

We can't see their feet but Dickey appears to be the tallest. The problem is that their listed heights do not reflect that.

Dickey 6'1"
Gehrig 6'0"
DiMaggio 6'2"
Lazzeri 5'11"

Dickey looks not only taller but larger overall. We cannot see their feet but none appears to be sitting or slouching enough to account for the discrepancies. DiMaggio is supposed to be the tallest. Does he took the tallest?

We expect weight to be inaccurate, especially for a player whose weight fluctuated during his career. See Babe Ruth: 6'2", 215 pounds.

Monday, June 19, 2017

Kansas City Royals: 30 Home Run seasons only 11 times. High: Steve Balboni 36 in 1985.

In 1969 the American League added two teams:
- Kansas City Royals; zero HR league leaders
- Seattle Pilots, who moved to Milwaukee and became the Brewers and changed leagues; currently in the National League; seven HR league leaders

The Royals players have hit at least 30 Home Runs in a season only 11 times. Brewers have done it 38 times, including eight times at least 40 and even one 50 HR season. See below.

Royals:
RkPlayerHRYearAgeTmLgGPAABRH2B3BRBIBBIBBSOHBPSHSFGDPSBCSBAOBPSLGOPSPos
1Steve Balboni36198528KCRAL16066260074146282885241665051411.243.307.477.783*3/H
2Gary Gaetti35199536KCRAL137578514761342709647691836733.261.329.518.846*53/DH
3Dean Palmer34199829KCRAL1526395728415927211948313460131882.278.333.510.844*5D/H
4Danny Tartabull34198724KCRAL158667582951802731017921361051494.309.390.541.931*9/DH
5John Mayberry34197526KCRAL156683554951613811061191673415853.291.416.547.963*3D
6Jermaine Dye33200026KCRAL157679601107193412118696993061201.321.390.561.951*9D/H
7Bo Jackson32198926KCRAL1355615158613215610539817230410269.256.310.495.805*7D/H8
8Danny Tartabull31199128KCRAL13255748478153353100656121305963.316.397.593.990*9/DH
9Kendrys Morales30201633KCRAL15461855865147240934821207052000.263.327.468.795*D/3H9
10Chili Davis30199737KCRAL14056747771133200908516961041563.279.386.509.896*D/H
11George Brett30198532KCRAL15566555010818438511210331493091291.335.436.5851.022*5/HD

Brewers:
RkPlayerHRYearAgeTmLgGPAABRH2B3BRBIBBIBBSOHBPSHSFGDPSBCSBAOBPSLGOPSPos
1Prince Fielder50200723MILNL15868157310916535211990211211404922.288.395.6181.013*3/DH
2Prince Fielder46200925MILNL162719591103177353141110211389091423.299.412.6021.014*3
3Richie Sexson45200328MILNL162718606971652821249871519051823.272.379.548.927*3
4Richie Sexson45200126MILNL158667598941622431256051786032024.271.342.547.889*3
5Gorman Thomas45197928MILAL15666855797136290123986175256815.244.356.539.895*8/D
6Chris Carter41201629MILNL160644549841222719476120690101831.222.321.499.821*3/HD
7Ryan Braun41201228MILNL1546775981081913631126315128110512307.319.391.595.987*7/DH
8Ben Oglivie41198031MILAL156660592941802621185419715095119.304.362.563.925*7/D98
9Gorman Thomas39198231MILAL158666567961392911128451434561037.245.343.506.850*8/H
10Prince Fielder38201127MILNL162692569951703611201073210610061711.299.415.566.981*3/D
11Jeromy Burnitz38199829MILNL16169160992160281125707158417974.263.339.499.838*9/H8
12Gorman Thomas38198029MILAL16269762878150263105584170236785.239.303.471.774*8/D
13Ryan Braun37200824MILNL1516636119217439710642412960413144.285.335.553.888*7/HD
14George Scott36197531MILAL15867561786176264109517973132665.285.341.515.857*3D/5H
15Bill Hall35200626MILNL148608537101145394856361621341289.270.345.553.899*65/8H4
16Prince Fielder34200824MILNL159694588861623021028419134120101232.276.372.507.879*3/D
17Ryan Braun34200723MILNL113492451911462669729111270513155.324.370.6341.004*5/H
18Jeromy Burnitz34200132MILNL154651562104141324100809150504804.251.347.504.851*9/H
19Geoff Jenkins34200025MILNL1355645121001553649433613515049111.303.360.588.948*7/H
20John Jaha34199630MILAL1486365431081632811188511185031631.300.398.543.941*3D/H
21Ben Oglivie34198233MILAL15967760292147221102701381401635.244.326.453.780*7/H
22Larry Hisle34197831MILAL142600520961512401156739053514106.290.374.533.9067D8/H9
23Ryan Braun33201127MILNL150629563109187386111582935039336.332.397.597.994*7/HD
24Jeromy Burnitz33199930MILNL1305804678712633210391712416061173.270.402.561.963*9/D
25Rob Deer33198625MILAL1345464667510817386723179323452.232.336.494.830*9/3H7
RkPlayerHRYearAgeTmLgGPAABRH2B3BRBIBBIBBSOHBPSHSFGDPSBCSBAOBPSLGOPSPos
26Prince Fielder32201026MILNL16171457894151250831141713821011210.261.401.471.871*3/D
27Ryan Braun32200925MILNL15870863511320339611457112113036206.320.386.551.937*7/H
28Carlos Lee32200529MILNL162688618851644101145778720118134.265.324.487.811*7
29Cecil Cooper32198232MILAL15569665410420538312132753046423.313.342.528.870*3/D
30Gorman Thomas32197827MILAL1375364527011124186734133263634.246.351.515.866*8/H
31Corey Hart31201028MILNL145614558911583441024521406051476.283.340.525.865*9/H
32Jeromy Burnitz31200031MILNL1616865649113129298991012114091264.232.356.456.811*9/HD
33Greg Vaughn31199630MILAL102442375781051609558499405652.280.378.571.948*7/8HD
34Tommy Harper31197029MILAL1546926041041793548277510743483816.296.377.522.899*54/78H9
35Ryan Braun30201632MILNL135564511801562339146109840320165.305.365.538.903*7/HD9
36Corey Hart30201230MILNL149622562911523548344515111231350.270.334.507.841*39/H
37Greg Vaughn30199327MILAL154667569971522829789141185046107.267.369.482.850*7D/H
38Cecil Cooper30198333MILAL160710661106203373126377631381721.307.341.508.849*3/DH