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Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Pace of Game Committee: It is not an objective of ours to achieve a dramatic time reduction right away.

"Pace of Game Committee wants to take measured steps as we address this industry goal to quicken the pace of our great game. It is not an objective of ours to achieve a dramatic time reduction right away; it is more important to develop a culture of better habits and a structure with more exact timings for non-game action."  Atlanta Braves President John Schuerholz, the Chairman of Major League Baseball's Pace of Game and Instant Replay Committees

From post:

Baseball Think: keeping time without a clock: "one Mississippi, two Mississippi, ...".  Saturday, February 21, 2015

Say what?  They do not want to "achieve a dramatic time reduction right away".  What?  Do it so slowly that it will not be noticeable and therefore ineffective.  That's the objective?  To doom the effort?  ...

The problem is the DEAD time between the 300 pitches in each game.  They still don't understand that.  When there should be play, there is inaction that has nothing to do with the nature of the game.  Mindless dead time does not equate to time honored matching of wits between batter and pitcher.
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What happens when fast pace minor leaguers get to the majors?  Sunday, February 22, 2015

Radical change is needed and in this case radical also means swift.  We generally tend to think that gradual change is best.  But often what is needed is a JOLT!  You don't stimulate the economy with an extra $10 in people's paycheck starting at some indeterminate time in the future.  You don't wake up people with a refreshingly well paced baseball game by SLOWLY changing the mind numbing pace so gradually that people not only do not notice but cannot notice.

2015 opening day games should seem radically different from those that concluded the reign of boredom that too long commissioner Allan Huber "Bud" Selig caused to replace any semblance of the game we once knew.  But they won't seem radically different because Selig's bag man replacement Manfred, the A-Rod Slayer, has little stomach for it and not much more imagination than his benefactor Selig.  Manfred will be the typical company man even as the company rots.

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