Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Pitchers accountable for strikeouts, walks and homers. I disagree.

I was just starting to read an article, which sets this as an accepted basis upon which new stuff can be based.

Time out.  Time the heck out.

I never signed on to this.

1. Strike outs and walks are based on the calling of balls and strikes by the plate umpire, to say nothing about the notorious pitch framing by catchers who now get compensated for successfully deceiving the plate umpire.  See Russell Martin.

Who the heck thinks that is within the control of the pitcher?  I do not.

2. Home runs are a function of the distance from home plate of the fences and the height of those fences.  All of that is far beyond the control of the pitcher.

So what the heck are people talking about with this true event stuff?

Changes I have long advocated that would make this logical:

1. Balls and strikes should be determined by whether a pitch hits a fixed target.  This should certainly no be done by guessing whether a pitch has passed through an imaginary, irregularly shaped three dimensional area that varies in height  from batter to batter.  A bull's eye on a tripod would do nicely.  Low tech and inexpensive.

Boston Red Sox tribute to Ted Williams July 22, 2002 by Cavic Steve Lipofsky via Wikimedia Commons

2. Home runs should be determined by requiring that the ball travel on a fly over fences that are the same height and the same distance from home plate in all directions in all ball parks.

These changes would make the game much more fair and also provide a foundation for the types of data analysis that is being introduced.  There's an old data saying:

Garbage in, garbage out.

Monday, May 4, 2015

Yankees - Red Sox: 3 hours, 52 minutes. Wow, down 8 minutes.

Games are still way too slow, both in pace of play and length.

Sunday, May 3, 2015, 8:05pm, Fenway Park
Attendance: 33,198, Time of Game: 3:52
Yankees 8, Red Sox 5

My previous post:

Pace of play improvement policy abandoned?  Sunday, May 3, 2015 7:53 AM

Virtually every batter still delays after virtually pitch.  Then the pitchers go into their act.  Hanley Ramirez was adjusting his batting gloves after each pitch yesterday, even if he merely took the pitch.  Batters don't do that during batting practice, nor do they step out of the box.  Why?  Because it's unnecessary and it ruins their rhythm.

Length of game is related but different from pace of play, which is much more important. That's obvious.  And while it's good that games are being completed in less time, is it a big improvement for a Yankee - Red Sox game to go from 3:58 to 3:50?  Who would even notice?  ...

What a mess.  Manfred, the A-Rod Slayer, could not even do this.  What a joke.
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I pretty much nailed it.

Two hours, 36 minutes for the greatest game of all time: Pirates 10, Yankees 9.  Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Let's throw game seven of the 1960 World Series into the mix from yesterday's post.

Monday, July 22, 2013
Four hours, 46 minutes for eleven innings. That's entertainment?  ...

For more context, that 1960 WS game had only five walks and no strike outs.  NO STRIKE OUTS!  That's one of the reasons I consider it the greatest game of all time.  Walks and strike outs increase the number of pitches, which, of course, increases the time.
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Sunday, May 3, 2015

Pace of play improvement policy abandoned?

During yesterday's May 2 Yankee game in Boston the announcers had a brief, innocuous discussion of the pace of play policy of the Major Baseball League (MBL).  Ken Singleton casually mentioned that he had read that the league and players association had agreed to not implement the minor fine system that was supposed to have started May 1.  The reason?  Changes had gone so well that it was thought to be unnecessary, that length of games had been reduced by eight minutes.

Hanley Ramirez in Baltimore 4/24/15
by Keith Allison
via Wikimedia Commons
Say what?  Virtually every batter still delays after virtually pitch.  Then the pitchers go into their act.  Hanley Ramirez was adjusting his batting gloves after each pitch yesterday, even if he merely took the pitch.  Batters don't do that during batting practice, nor do they step out of the box.  Why?  Because it's unnecessary and it ruins their rhythm.

Length of game is related but different from pace of play, which is much more important. That's obvious.  And while it's good that games are being completed in less time, is it a big improvement for a Yankee - Red Sox game to go from 3:58 to 3:50?  Who would even notice?

http://mlb.mlb.com/news/press_releases/intro.jsp

If the league even bothered to issue a press release about it abandoning the matter and declaring victory, I could not find it.  What a mess.  Manfred, the A-Rod Slayer, could not even do this.  What a joke.

Pace of play warning month was not enforced. Now what?  Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Am I the only one who is even more aggravated by dead time between pitches now that reform is supposedly being implemented?  ...

The first month of the regular season was supposed to be a grace period during which umpires would warn batters of violations of new speed up rules.  Has anyone noticed any umpire warn any batter?  I have not.
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May 1: fines begin for pace of game violations. Yeah, right.  Friday, May 1, 2015

Yeah, right.  I'll be looking for David Ortiz to be confronted by the plate umpire in tonight's Yankee game in Boston.  Yeah, right...

Manfred, the A-Rod Slayer, will finally have to enforce something, not just babble about how he'll consider any and all suggestions.  Yeah, right.
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Saturday, May 2, 2015

Red Sox fans suck: boo Alex Rodriguez milestone.

Last night in Boston Red Sox fans booed Alex Rodriguez when he stepped from the dugout to pinch hit in the 8th inning with the Yankees and Red Sox tied 2-2.  Rodriguez smashed a dramatic home run to both win the game for the Yankees and also reach an historic milestone.  Rodriguez tied Willie Mays at 660 career home runs.  Mays accomplished this with almost 1,000 more at bats, a fact lost on everyone one else in this galaxy.

Red Sox fans then displayed the monumental poor taste, lack of sportsmanship and hypocrisy to boo Rodriguez as he quickly circled the bases.  Were they just being playful or mean spirited representatives of all baseball fans.  Or are they just too dumb to know why they did it?  Who boos a milestone, even by a player of your arch rival?  Who does that?

Boston Whiteskins Wednesday, October 30, 2013

I have long maintained that there are probably more black people on the teams than in the stands at a Red Sox game in Fenway Park in Boston, MA...

Boston was the last of the 16 major league teams to have a black player: Pumpsie Green July 21, 1959...


Red Sox nation is insulated and isolated geographically, culturally and racially.

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Red Sox and Cardinal precedents. Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Do the same people attend each game in Fenway Park?  See figures below for 2013, 1975, 1967 and my previous post: Boston Whiteskins...

1918 World Series (4-2): Boston Red Sox (75-51) over Chicago Cubs (84-45) ...

The Red Sox won game six at Fenway Park before 15,238 fans...


Ruth would set single season home run records in each of the next three seasons:
1919 29 Red Sox home park: Fenway Park
1920 54 Yankees home park: Polo Grounds
1921 59 Yankees home park: Polo Grounds.


Thus was born the "Curse of the Bambino", the transfer of Babe Ruth from the Red Sox to the Yankees.  In 1927 Ruth broke his own record for the final time with 60 home runs playing his home games in Yankee Stadium.

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Red Sox nation, the Evil Empire. Thursday, October 31, 2013

2013 Major Baseball League (MBL) tournament ... games 6 and 7 being scheduled in Fenway Park Boston ...

The media is all over the fact that this is the first time since 1918 that Boston can celebrate at home.  Actually, that circumstance was enjoyed by only 38,447 members of Red Sox nation, one more than in game 2 and two more than in game 1.  Presumably this would be the usual tight knit group of white people...

And lest we forget the Ryan Dempster and Alex Rodriguez incident:

Monday, August 19, 2013  Coward Ryan Dempster should be suspended 211 games for deliberately hitting Alex Rodriguez.

To their disgrace nearly all the Red Sox fans in Fenway Park cheered this vigilante act.  A pitcher deliberately hitting a batter is much worse than a batter using steroids.  And these Boston hypocrites ignore the fact that the best player on the two Boston championship teams this millennium was Manny Ramirez, the only Hall of Fame caliber player to serve suspensions for using banned performance enhancing drugs (PED).  Not to mention David Ortiz who is still a member of the Red Sox.  All of Boston should be ashamed.  Last night a representative sample of its population became the ugly mob.  I've long thought that the two baseball teams combined, including coaches, had more black people than were in the stands for a typical baseball game at Fenway Park.  Check for yourself the next time you watch a game there on TV.  When the Red Sox took the field last night the closest player to a person of color was Shane Victorino.  That must have been comforting to the most parochial narrow minded fans among the 28 cities that have MBL teams.

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With the Yankees determined to get their team payroll under the $189 million cap in 2014, Boston may well have the highest AC payroll next season.  Red Sox nation, the destroyer of worlds in three of the last ten seasons, will truly be the Evil Empire.

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In 2014 the Red Sox honored players from their 2004 championship team, featuring Manny Ramirez.  Red Sox fans cheered him wildly.  Irony abounds.

Maybe Red Sox fans are grumpy about stuff like:
- Ted Williams son having his father's corpse frozen
- Wade Boggs getting hit number 3,000 for Tampa
- Roger Clemens getting win number 300 for the Yankees
- guilt over being the evil empire.

One of my long time statements: I never met a Met fan who knew what he was talking about or a Boston fan of any sport.

So what are the origins of the Red Sox fans hating Rodriguez?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alex_Rodriguez
Alex Rodriguez 2008-04-19.jpg
Following the 2003 season, Texas set out to move Rodriguez and his expensive contract. The Rangers initially agreed to a trade with the Boston Red Sox, but the Major League Baseball Players Association vetoed the deal because it called for a voluntary reduction in salary by Rodriguez.
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Rodriguez agreed to reduce his salary to become a Red Sox player and then the Red Sox fans hated him when that was blocked and Rodriguez was subsequently traded to the rival Yankees.  Red Sox fans are dumb.

Compound that with the apparently still raging hysteria about performance enhancing drugs (PED) and the result is what happened last night.  Some perspective is in order.  Recent disgraceful events in Baltimore prompted the Orioles to play a game a few days ago but bar fans from attending.  The Times ran an article on this type of sports thing and most examples involved soccer, a truly mindless team sport.

Oh, and to drive home that point about the at bat discrepancy: who had the advantage?


Rk Player AB HR From To Age G PA R H 2B 3B RBI BB IBB SO HBP SH SF GDP SB CS BA OBP SLG OPS Pos Tm
1 Babe Ruth 8399 714 1914 1935 19-40 2504 10622 2174 2873 506 136 2214 2062 1330 43 113 2 123 117 .342 .474 .690 1.164 971/H83 BOS-NYY-BSN
2 Barry Bonds 9847 762 1986 2007 21-42 2986 12606 2227 2935 601 77 1996 2558 688 1539 106 4 91 165 514 141 .298 .444 .607 1.051 *78H/D9 PIT-SFG
3 Alex Rodriguez 9888 660 1994 2015 18-39 2589 11429 1933 2956 523 30 1983 1255 93 2098 169 16 101 241 322 76 .299 .384 .558 .942 65D/H3 SEA-TEX-NYY
4 Willie Mays 10881 660 1951 1973 20-42 2992 12496 2062 3283 523 140 1903 1464 192 1526 44 13 91 251 338 103 .302 .384 .557 .941 *8H/39675 NYG-SFG-NYM
5 Hank Aaron 12364 755 1954 1976 20-42 3298 13941 2174 3771 624 98 2297 1402 293 1383 32 21 121 328 240 73 .305 .374 .555 .928 *9783DH/45 MLN-ATL-MIL
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 5/2/2015.

Would Red Sox fans have booed hit number 3,000 by Rodriguez?  A-Rod has 2,956 Hits so we might know soon how that milestone is treated.  I'm guessing more favorably, home or road, even in Boston.  We Americans are whacky when it comes to home runs.

I hate defending the likes of Barry Bonds and Alex Rodriguez.  Both can be engaging but both are liars and Bonds is mean spirited, which Rodriguez is not.  When Bonds broke the season home run record I thought: I don't like this guy but I've got to hand it to him.  What he did was amazing.


That should have been the reaction of Red Sox fans last night when Rodriguez hit a home run that should have quieted the crowd.  Just sit there in silence but don't boo.  Take it like a reasonable baseball fan.  Then, maybe, give the guy his due and applaud.  Soft, admiring applause would have been in order.  A-Rod overcame your rough treatment in this game situation and hit a milestone home run too.  Deal with it with some sense of sportsmanship and self respect.

Courtesy runners were allowed until 1950.

What I suggested again in a recent post has precedent.  Players should be allowed to re-enter the game.

Pitchers hitting is an oxymoron. Designated FIELDER is the answer, along with re-entry and roster of 30. Thursday, April 30, 2015

re-entry within the confines of the batting order

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http://www.baseball-reference.com/bullpen/Pinch_runner

Courtesy Runners

In the early days of baseball, when rosters were much more limited, there were courtesy runners in addition to pinch runners. A courtesy runner was put in when the normal runner was temporarily incapacitated by an injury. A courtesy runner had to be agreed by the opposite manager, and his presence in the game was not considered as an official substitution. He could therefore be used again once his running duty was completed, or could be a player already in the line-up, and the player for whom he ran would usually return to the game in the next half-inning. In contrast with pinch runners, courtesy runners tended to be slow base runners. The last courtesy runner in a Major League Game was used in 1949 (list of all courtesy runners from Retrosheet)

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http://retrosheet.org/courtesy.htm

Courtesy Runners

Until 1950, a courtesy runner was allowed for a player if that player had been injured and at the moment couldn't continue. The original player then stayed in the game defensively in the next inning, although sometimes the injured player did not return. If the replacement runner was already in the game, we still count this as a courtesy runner. Most often the courtesy runner was already in the lineup. We also have four examples of courtesy fielders listed here...


8/10/1952 (Cubs at Pirates, game 2) - (COURTESY FIELDER) In the top of the ninth of the second game of a twin bill, Pirates catcher Clyde McCullough was injured and could not continue. The Pirates two other catchers, Eddie Fitzgerald and Joe Garagiola, had already been used in the game as pinch hitters. With the approval of Cubs manager Phil Cavarretta, Fitzgerald was allowed to replace McCullough. The Cubs won the game 4-3. Under the playing rules in effect since the 1950 season, that was an illegal substitution that the umpires should not have allowed.
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http://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/PIT/PIT195208102.shtml

Photo of Ed Fitz GeraldEd Fitz Gerald PH-C

Friday, May 1, 2015

May 1: fines begin for pace of game violations. Yeah, right.

Yeah, right.  I'll be looking for David Ortiz to be confronted by the plate umpire in tonight's Yankee game in Boston.  Yeah, right.

David Ortiz March 31, 2014 by Keith Allison via Wikimedia Commons
Pace of play warning month was not enforced. Now what? Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Am I the only one who is even more aggravated by dead time between pitches now that reform is supposedly being implemented? ...

Don't be fooled by the total length of games decreasing.  The issue is the PACE of play when the players are supposed to be playing. Play is the key syllable...

The first month of the regular season was supposed to be a grace period during which umpires would warn batters of violations of new speed up rules.  Has anyone noticed any umpire warn any batter?  I have not. May 1 batters are supposed to be fined for delays.  Who decides?  The same lame umpires who are now aiding and abetting the slow down?

And batters are predictably sliding back into their bad habits...

Dead time between pitches is killing baseball.  Even after Dr. Death, Allan Huber "Bud" Selig, has past from the national pastime that's past its time.

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Time limit for running out a home RUN. Inspired by David Ortiz, Fat Papi. Wednesday, July 30, 2014

David Ortiz seems determined to be as obnoxious as possible as often as possible.  The other day he had yet another incident of poor sportsmanship: hitting a home run and taking far too long to start running and far too long circling the bases.  Later the pitcher objected to this and Ortiz compounded things by verbally insulting the pitcher.

... a creative suggestion: a time limit starting when the ball is hit.  That impacts both the standing at home plate and also the tortuously slow home run trot...

The penalty?  The batter gets the number of bases reached when time runs out.  So, if Ortiz takes his not so sweet time, he may only get a triple or double.  Heck, he might even be out if he just stands there making a fool of himself as usual.

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Manfred, the A-Rod Slayer, will finally have to enforce something, not just babble about how he'll consider any and all suggestions.  Yeah, right.

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Pitchers hitting is an oxymoron. Designated FIELDER is the answer, along with re-entry and roster of 30.

Oxymorona figure of speech by which a locution produces an incongruous,seemingly self-contradictory effect, as in “cruel kindness” or “to make haste slowly.”. 

By Edward Simpson from London, England via Wikimedia Commons
Don't ask why but last night I was watching some of the Mets game against the Marlins.  I guess I wanted to see Giancarlo Stanton.  I actually had the sound on when the announcers were reading twitter messages, presumably from Met fans, expressing their anguish over the possibility of the designated hitter (DH) rule coming to their National League.  That's been a hot topic for some reason because a National pitcher, Cardinal Adam Wainwright, injured himself badly a couple of days ago when he started to run out of the batter's box.  The Met announcers amused themselves mocking the inept batting of Met pitcher Bartolo Colon.

Oxymoron certainly contains the two syllables to describe DH advocates.

Merger: AL and NL merged years ago. How come no one noticed? Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Read all about it!  It's NOT a league!  Wake the heck up!

From the original 2006 Radical Baseball document posted here in 2008:

http://radicalbaseball.blogspot.com/2008/02/radical-baseball.html

5. Designated Fielders and the Six-Player Batting Order.

There should be designated fielders, not a designated hitter. Everybody fields but a team has the option to have up to three players only play the field and not bat. Six batters in a lineup. That’s the minimum there could be without a batter coming up with himself on base. They’d get 1,000 plate appearances a season, comparable to the number of batters faced by a starting pitcher. This would improve both offense and defense. It addresses those sappy complaints of National League fans without having to watch the dreaded bottom of the order. Who wants to watch the bottom of the order? No one, except people who are actually interested in sacrifice bunting and all the brain power involved in making that decision. Oh, and the double switch. Take me out to the ball game so I can see a double switch in person. Complaining about batters not knowing how to bunt is like complaining about American soldiers not knowing how to load a musket. Who cares? Bombs away. Batter up, not bunter up.

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There, that was easy.  I'm guessing baseball fans won't embrace the six batter thing all at once, so I'd settle for eight batters and one DF as a start.  Combine that with re-entry within the confines of the batting order and now you've got the possibility of real decisions to be made during a game, not the kiddie stuff that's passed for thinking all this time.

Allow players to re-enter games. Sunday, March 23, 2014

The basic reasons to oppose are based on people being too dumb and lazy to consider any change.  Generally, the initial impulses are:

1. Invoke accusations of blasphemy.

2. State that there is no practical way that it could work.

3. Insist that it will slow down the game...

Somebody is reading this and having conniptions imagining perpetual changing of batter and pitcher into eternity with no resolution.  Back and forth with no pitch being thrown.  Enough already.  We'll devise implementation rules.  The main point is to allow players to return, not dwell on how and/or why this should not be done.

Baseball fans delude themselves into imagining that baseball is special because it is so primitive that the extreme limitations cause the very few moves to be so much more compelling.  Grow the heck up.  It's just dumb.

Baseball managers make almost no significant decisions in the first half of a game.  The only one possible is to remove the starting pitcher and the manager does that only under extreme duress.  He might as well send the starting lineup to the plate umpire by e-mail and show up in the fifth inning.

About half the players do not play in most baseball games...

Allow players to re-enter games.  Once that concept is accepted, then we can work on how to implement.

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Oh, and a thirty player roster with 25 active for a game would make all this even better and smooth over any concerns of the players. It is probably also cost effective because the marginal extra five players might help prevent injury due to overuse of the better and higher paid players.

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Pace of play warning month was not enforced. Now what?

Am I the only one who is even more aggravated by dead time between pitches now that reform is supposedly being implemented?

Manfred, the A-Rod Slayer, on pace of play changes: evolutionary, rather than radical. Thursday, April 2, 2015

Don't be fooled by the total length of games decreasing.  The issue is the PACE of play when the players are supposed to be playing. Play is the key syllable.

Daniel Murphy of the Mets actually pauses to adjust his batting gloves between each pitch.  Who else does that anymore?  Pretty much every batter places one foot out of the batter's box after each pitch.

After the first couple of the exhibition games I did not notice any meaningful attempt by batters to adjust to the changes and stop jerking around.  The first month of the regular season was supposed to be a grace period during which umpires would warn batters of violations of new speed up rules.  Has anyone noticed any umpire warn any batter?  I have not. May 1 batters are supposed to be fined for delays.  Who decides?  The same lame umpires who are now aiding and abetting the slow down?

And batters are predictably sliding back into their bad habits.  They are even starting to turn their backs on home plate and walk away between pitches.  That's something that started about four years ago and had become increasingly prevalent and is the one reform this season that showed noticeable improvement and now even that nonsense is showing up again.

With one exception dealt with below batters never bother to ask for time out.  Umpires never call time out.  Never.  The one foot out of the box is, as I had predicted, an implied time out, which the pitchers mindlessly never challenge.  Would it kill a pitcher to throw one right down the middle as soon as the batter steps out with one foot?  It should be a strike.  What's the plate umpire going to do, call a quick pitch?  The ump never called time out after the batter had been set, so how is it a quick pitch?  If the batter dropped his guard, that's his fault.  Protect yourself at all times.  That's the basic rule in boxing and in football.

What's with the deal of a batter actually asking for time as the pitcher is starting his delivery and the plate umpire sprinting out of position and waving like crazy that time is out?  What the heck is that?  Why do that?  Is it some lame attempt to protect the batter in case he is incapacitated?  If something blew into the batter's eye, too bad.  In football a cornerback may not ask for time out after a play has started because a gust of wind blew something into his eye.  Good luck with that.

Play does not stop for equipment replacement when a lineman's shoulder pads pop a strap.  The lineman plays on or leaves for repair and is replaced.  Oh, I forgot.  Baseball is too primitive to permit re-entry.  Instead everyone stands around like doofuses.

Once that batter is set, unless he leaves the box to legitimately run out a batted ball, he must remain in the box or be called out.  You step out, you're out, even if you step with only one foot.  Pretty simple, basic and fair.  Come on.  Dead time between pitches is killing baseball.  Even after Dr. Death, Allan Huber "Bud" Selig, has past from the national pastime that's past its time.

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Steinbrenner Kids and Mad Dog out of step on Rodriguez catching Mays.

Public opinion, at least among Yankee fans, clearly supports A-Rod.

Hoping for a Milestone From Alex Rodriguez, Yankees Fans Settle for a Win
By ZACH SCHONBRUN APRIL 27, 2015 The New York Times


Fans flocked to Yankee Stadium on Monday to see a milestone for Alex Rodriguez...

Rodriguez’s compelling pursuit of career home run No. 660 will endure for at least one more game...

“The reality is it’s 660 home runs,” Joe Girardi said. “I don’t know what you’ll say, but when you look in the record books, his name is going to be there.” ...


Brian McCann said he would be excited for him.

“It’s a big number,” McCann said. “It’s a treat to watch him day in and day out. Watching him hit off a tee is exciting.”
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When Alex Rodriguez passes Willie Mays in home runs ... Friday, April 24, 2015

Steinbrenner Kids: add tacky to dumb and lazy: trying to void A-Rod's bonus.  Tuesday, January 27, 2015

To A-Rod or Not to A-Rod. That is the question. Thursday, November 6, 2014

So the question is just how stupid are the Steinbrenner Kids? ...

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How stupid indeed.  Even the YES Network, which their late father George started a decade ago and which the Kids sold after his death, is promoting Alex Rodriguez hitting career home run 660 to tie Willie Mays.

Yesterday on the MLB Network Chris Russo, self proclaimed Mad Dog, went into a tirade about this.  Screaming and repeating, Russo claimed that no one other than some Yankee fans would care about Rodriguez passing Mays, Babe Ruth, Hank Aaron or Barry Bonds.  Mad Dog insists that even if Rodriguez somehow hits 109 home runs in the three years left on his Yankee contract and sets a new record that no one will or should care.  Now that's mad.  It should be noted that Russo loves the Giants and Mays and he hates the Yankees.  During his many years on New York WFAN talk radio Russo persistently bashed the local team and reveled in taunting Yankee fans personally.

Russo even screamed against my idea of Rodriguez reaching an agreement that his home run bonus money go to charity.  Please note the date:

A-Rod, just donate the bonus money to charity. Call out Levine and the Steinbrenner Kids. Thursday, January 29, 2015

Alex Rodriguez should call their bluff.  Offer to donate the bonus money to a charity agreed to by both parties.  Make them look like the fools they are.
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Which brings us back to the Steinbrenner Kids.  What the heck?  Why denigrate your product and brand?  When Rodriguez batted with the bases loaded in last night's game the fans at the game and those of us watching on TV were really pulling for Rodriguez to crush one and make his Mays matcher special.  Rodriguez failed but when he does tie Mays Yankee fans will want a curtain call, with Rodriguez taking a second bow from the dugout.

There is some extra emphasis for old Yankee fans like me.  In many posts here I have lauded Willie Mays, including insisting that Mays was clearly better than Aaron.  I've largely overcome the youthful animosity that caused Mickey Mantle fans to take an unyielding side on the question of who was better, Mantle or Mays.  This was born of their both becoming great in New York 1954-1957.  I do not recall those seasons but inherited the fan rivalry.  I now can more fully appreciate the greatness of Mays.  However, there is still some jealousy and friction and Rodriguez is a Yankee, the greatest since Mantle, who will vanquish the great Giant Mays, even if there is an asterisk.