Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Most records: Ruth, Aaron, Rose, ...?

Babe Ruth set a new career home run record for every homer after number 138 when he passed Roger Connor in 1921.  That's 714 - 138 = 576.

Ruth broke the old season home run record of 27 in 1919 and went on to reach 60 in 1927.  Each homer after 27 was a new record: 60 - 27 = 33.

That's 576 + 33 = 609.  Ruth had a few other records, including some in the World Series:
- most consecutive shutout innings pitched: 29.66; broken by Whitey Ford: 32
- most career home runs: 15; broken by Mickey Mantle: 18
- most home runs in a game: 3; tied by Reggie Jackson and Pablo Sandoval.  Ruth did it twice.

Hank Aaron
Baseball Digest December 1960
via Wikimedia Commons
Hank Aaron set the record for most outs in 1972 when he passed Rabbit Maranville who had 7,906.  Aaron finished with 9,136.  9136 - 7906 = 1,230.  Plus, Aaron had a bunch of positive records.  Aaron passed Ruth in career homers: 755 - 714 = 41.

Pete Rose passed Aaron in outs in 1982 and soared to 10,328.  10,328 - 9,136 = 1,192.  Rose also broke the career hit record of Ty Cobb in 1985: 4,256 - 4,189 = 67.

Rickey Henderson had 468 more stolen bases than Lou Brock: 1,406-938.

OK, you get the idea.  Who set the most records?  Betas me.  Too much work.

Parity roller coaster.

14 of 30 teams are within two games of .500 after about 20 games.

12-10: Rockies
10-10: Mets, Phillies, Rays, Angels
11-10: Nationals, Giants
9-10: Orioles, Twins
10-11: Marlins, Padres, White Sox
9-11: Reds, Indians

Brewers are 9 games over .500: 15-6.

Braves and As are 6 games over: 13-7.

Diamondbacks are 13 under: 5-18; 8 games behind the Dodgers (12-9).

Lead for division leaders:
Brewers 3
Braves 2.5
Yankees 1
Tigers 1
As .5
Dodgers .5

Deficit for teams in last:
Diamondbacks 8
Cubs 7
Astros 6.5
Red Sox 3.5
Marlins 3.5
Indians 2.5

With six divisions there are six first place teams ... and six last place teams.

With two wild card spots for the tournament in addition to division winners many teams will be contending at the end of the season.  Most will be disappointed.  Even the teams that get into the tournament with low seeds will not have much success.

Will fans and players become fatigued from this roller coaster dynamic?

At Coney Island's Luna Park in Brooklyn, New York, a new $10 million steel Thunderbolt will sit on the site of the original wooden Thunderbolt that terrified thrill-seekers from the 1920s through the '80s. The coaster, expected to open in May, is seen here in a rendering.

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

I oppose both hot dogging and vigilante violence.

The recent confrontation between Milwaukee and Pittsburgh precipitated by the Pittsburgh pitcher mouthing off unnecessarily resulted in dysfunctional commissioner Allen Huber "Bud" Selig suspending five players but not the one who initiated the brawl.

More and more I hear media types advocating for more hot dogging, particularly for Latin players, as if that is an integral part of their cultures.  Even if it is, they are playing in our culture where I'd like to delude myself that hot dogging is anathema.

I think that boxer Cassius Clay/Muhammad Ali popularized hot dogging and mocking opponents in the 1960s and it has spread throughout our team sports.  Too many NFL players are preening jackasses and NBA players taunting thugs.

That's what media clowns want baseball players to be?

Baseball players should behave properly:

Don't hot dog.

Don't dog it.

Don't show off.

Don't taunt.

The Major Baseball League (MBL) should enforce behavior rules.  Individual players should not try to impose violent vigilante justice for violations of unwritten protocols.

This stuff should finally be written down and not left to the imagination.  It's about time.

Brian McCann is an asshole and Yanks should not sign him.  Monday, November 25, 2013

Monday, April 21, 2014

Home runs hit in Roosevelt Stadium 1956-1957.

Eddie Mathews led the visitors with two homers in two games in Roosevelt Stadium in Jersey City, NJ.


Rk I Player Split From To G HR GS PA AB R H 2B 3B RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS TB GDP HBP SH SF IBB ROE BAbip
1 Eddie Mathews JER02 1956 1957 2 2 2 8 8 2 2 0 0 3 0 1 0 1 .250 .250 1.000 1.250 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
2 Duke Snider JER02 1956 1957 14 2 14 58 51 7 12 1 1 4 0 2 5 13 .235 .304 .412 .715 21 1 0 2 0 1 1 .278
3 Ernie Banks JER02 1956 1957 2 1 2 8 7 1 3 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 .429 .500 .857 1.357 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333
4 Carl Furillo JER02 1956 1957 12 1 11 46 36 6 9 2 1 5 0 0 8 2 .250 .386 .444 .831 16 2 0 2 0 3 1 .242
5 Jackie Robinson JER02 1956 1956 6 1 5 20 17 2 5 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 .294 .294 .471 .765 8 0 0 3 0 0 0 .286
6 Hank Sauer JER02 1956 1957 2 1 0 2 2 1 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 .500 .500 2.000 2.500 4 0 0 0 0 0 0
7 Frank Robinson JER02 1956 1957 2 1 2 8 8 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 .250 .250 .625 .875 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167
8 Harry Anderson JER02 1957 1957 2 1 2 9 9 1 3 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 .333 .333 .667 1.000 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 .286
9 Wally Moon JER02 1956 1957 2 1 2 8 8 1 2 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 .250 .250 .750 1.000 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143
10 Joe Adcock JER02 1956 1957 2 1 2 8 7 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 .286 .375 .714 1.089 5 0 0 0 0 1 0 .250
11 Willie Mays JER02 1956 1957 2 1 2 9 8 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 .250 .333 .625 .958 5 0 0 0 0 1 1 .143
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 4/21/2014.


Dodgers down under. What the heck, mate?  Wednesday, March 19, 2014


The Brooklyn Dodgers moved to Los Angeles after the 1957 season but they tested the west by playing 15 games in Roosevelt Stadium in Jersey City, NJ during their final two seasons in Brooklyn.
_________________________


It was used for fifteen "home" games by the Brooklyn Dodgers during their last two seasons in Brooklyn - seven in 1956 and eight in1957.[6] The games were played partly as a negotiating tactic with the Borough of Brooklyn, in pursuit of a new stadium to replace Ebbets Field.[7] While it had just 24,000 seats as opposed to Ebbets Field's 31,497, Roosevelt Stadium had 10,000 parking spaces compared to Ebbets Field's 700. The Dodgers' negotiation came to naught, and the team moved to Los Angeles, California in 1958.
_______________________________

Circa 1940

Most home runs by park and city.

Minimum 250 home runs (HR) per park.  Harmon Killebrew was close with 246 in his Minneapolis park, Metropolitan Stadium.  In Fenway Park Boston: Ted Williams 248, Carl Yastrzemski 237 .  But the champ in both categories was New York Giant Mel Ott.


playerHRABparkcityAB/HR
Mel Ott3234,576 Polo GroundsNew York14.17
Sammy Sosa2933,475 Wrigley FieldChicago11.86
Ernie Banks2904,734 Wrigley FieldChicago16.32
Mickey Mantle2663,970 Yankee StadiumNew York14.92
Mike Schmidt2654,020 Veterans StadiumPhiladelphia15.17
Babe Ruth2592,835 Yankee StadiumNew York10.95
Stan Musial2525,401 Sportsman ParkSt. Louis21.43
Lou Gehrig2513,861 Yankee StadiumNew York15.38


playerHRABparkscityAB/HR
Mel Ott3485,283 Polo/EbbetsNew York15.18
Babe Ruth3443,589 Polo/YankeeNew York10.43
Sammy Sosa3124,032 Com1/Com2/WrigleyChicago12.92
Ernie Banks2904,734 Wrigley FieldChicago16.32
Mickey Mantle2663,970 Yankee StadiumNew York14.92
Mike Schmidt2654,020 Veterans StadiumPhiladelphia15.17
Stan Musial2525,401 Sportsman ParkSt. Louis21.43
Lou Gehrig2513,861 Yankee StadiumNew York15.38

Goudey 1933 card
via Wikimedia Commons
I derived this from baseball-reference.com but had to do it by checking parks and individuals.  I could not run a general database query.  I quickly eliminated HR leaders.

Barry Bonds split time between Pittsburgh and San Francisco, where he played in two parks.

Hank Aaron played all but his final two seasons with the Braves but they moved from Milwaukee to Atlanta.

Willie Mays had a similar experience with his Giants.

Other career HR leaders played for multiple teams and/or in multiple parks.  I looked for obvious candidates.  Did I miss anyone?